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now, especially in syria. the what if scenarios. we'll spend a little bit of time on, and then their recommendations and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today are close to the street, ear on the ground, and in their constituencies, they are people whose opinions are sought and whose opinions are listened to. i want to introduce a canadian journalist, she's also a member of the serian national council formed in opposition to assad, holds a bachelor's degree, canadian, a poly-sci degree and working on her ph.d. right now. lecturing in istanbul, the international center for scholars, a special adviser to the turkish president in the snows. named one of the most 100 powerful arab women last year, appears on u.s. cable news channels quite often and the founder and chairman of the independent think tank beirut institute. safeen, a member of the kurdistan democratic party. he's also a member of the -- was a standing-in member of the iraqi governing council of the a
the world, i found myself thinking of those, everyone from folks in syria, in homes, trying to show what they could to focus here in oakland with camera phones, trying to show police misbehaving. someone who wrestled with the question of fact of journalism, how to protect people, whether they are citizens or professional. don't really have a big conversation about that. should there be an international standard of journalistic rights were if you are committing journalism you should be protected? out you protect those folks? >> good luck implementing that law. it is a great question, something journalists struggle with all time with a rise of social media and sites you have started out as a compendium of information, shootings in streets, be heading. started off like a visual wallpaper and it has since become more sophisticated and beginning to write articles, the editor is anonymous but they are starting to publish pieces. this thing that was touted early on as being this kind of innovative or new information delivery system is now turning into a more traditional journalistic entity but
. >> thank you upon >> brown: and now to the conflict in syria. nato said today that it would consider a turkish request to deploy patriot missiles to protect itself from syrian attacks. turkey and syria share a 560 mile border and after syrian mortar rounds landed in turkish territory, concerns have risen that the civil war fighting could spread further. in margaret warner's latest report, she examines the spill-over that's already happening. >> reporter: nestled up against the border with syria, ceylanpinar, turkey has an all- too-up-close view of the civil war next door, as fighting rages in its syrian twin city of ras- al-ain. for days last week on the syrian side, president bashar al assad's forces fought rebels of the free syrian army, or f.s.a., to control ras-al-ain. terrified syrian civilians scrambled, some over razor wire, into ceylanpinar. the f.s.a. finally took over the syrian town, but not before badly fraying nerves in its turkish neighbor. turk abdulazziz guven said he'd had to rescue his cousins from the syrian side. >> ( translated ): the fight started at 3:00. at 7:
need the money. and smiles. thank you. >> syria's civil war has spilled into turkey and lebanon and israel is getting dragged into the conflict and maybe it is just for a moment. but you know how the middle east goes, the death toll is growing all the while. [ female announcer ] a classic meatloaf recipe from stouffer's starts with ground beef, unions, and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of all? that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. >>shepard: for a second straight day the crisis in syria triggered an attack from israel and this time the hit was direct. yesterday, israel's military reported they fired a "warning shot" into syria after a shell from the syrian civil war struck an israeli military post. that was the first time israel had fired at syria in four decades today sources report that more stray mortar shells came so israeli soldiers say though fired back and hit a syrian army vehicle. the israeli soldiers were stationed along the border with syria. sources say the
's behind the egyptian leader's moves. >> brown: then, the death toll in syria's 20-month war has climbed past 40,000, according to a human rights group. we get an update from margaret warner, reporting from the turkish border. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. judy woodruff talks with virginia democrat tim kaine. >> i intend to hit the ground on january 3 very much running. > running. we can make progress quickly if we listen to each other and find those points of common ground they think do exist. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks analyze the weeks news. >> suarez: spencer michels has the story of a growing crackdown on dissidents and journalists in iran. >> brown: and we close with poet jennifer fitzgerald on hurricane sandy's destructive path through her home town of staten island. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation.
for syria. china cannot recently with a four-point plan. did you take this seriously? if so, could this be part of the new normal, china looking at a crisis the west is unable to solve far from its shores and saying, we have a position to take and could play a role on this? >> on to the back row. thank you for your brevity, folks. >> early in the discussion, you had asked about the dispute for the islands. your response was the chinese response was part of a long-term plan. in recent years, we have seen china make tremendous efforts certainly in the western hemisphere and africa to build an infrastructure to gain access of raw materials. at the same time, we have also seen them a tremendous efforts to build military to military relations. my question for the panel is, is that military dimension just an effort to protect economic interests or is it some part of a long-term plan to help lay the foundations for their assent to the position as a global power? >> one last gentleman and what neil diamond would call the tree people, hot august night. this gentleman. run the microphone to
warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web
of what were initially peaceful protests. obviously the situation in syria deteriorated since then. we have been extensively engaged with the international community as well as regional powers to help the opposition. we've committed hundreds of millions of dollars of humanitarian aid to help folks both inside of syria and outside of syria. we are constantly consulting with the opposition on how they can get organized so that they're not splintered and divided in the face of the onabsoluo onslaught of the assad regime. we are in close contact with countries like jordan who immediately border syria and israel who is already having grave concerns as we do, for example, about movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and that could have an impact not just within syria but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we're going to be talking to them, my envoys will be traveling to various meetings that will be taking place with the internationa
a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque. meanwhile, rebels say they have taken one of the two remaining government-controlled posts along the turkish border. in a rare interview, bashar al- assad was defiant. speaking to russian television, he ruled out the possibility he might go into exile. >> i am syrian. i will live and die in syria. >> assad warned the west against military intervention in the country and said such a move would have global ramifications and warned any intervention would have what he called a domino effect. meanwhile, syrian opposition politici
, dropped by a syrian air force jet, right on the border, about 10 meters inside syria. but very close, close enough to smash windows from the explosion in the adjacent turkish town and also causing a number of civilians to flee across the border. last thursday some been -- something like 9000 crossed the border. rebels of taken hold of it and now the government is struggling to dislodge them. and the battle goes on. extremely close to turkey. golan heights, the request of the ceasefire line on sunday -- an indication this war is very close to the border, sometimes spills over. but i think in both cases, the israeli case and the turkish case, neither of the two countries is looking to get embroiled in the struggle inside syria. they are watching it very closely. they have responded to things coming across the border in the immediate area, but they are not interested in blowing this up and starting a more general conflict with the syrian armed forces. >> we have also heard that under great arab and western pressure, the new opposition group -- putting aside the differences, the various
where tension is rising after israel and syria exchange fire across their border. in china, it's all change at the top. we have a special report on how the next generation is determined to tread its own path. >> i would like to be a software engineer. >> so you don't want to do the sort of things that your parents did? >> never. >> hello, it's midday here in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington. there's been a new twist to the sex scandal engulfing the american military top brass there. on friday, general david petraeus resigned as boss of the c.i.a. after it was revealed that he had been having an extra marital affair. now general john alan has been drawn into the scandal after what is being called inappropriate communications with a woman also linked to the affair. he has denied any wrong doing, but his application for a top nato job has been put on hold. >> there will be moments like this -- >> another top american commander, another career threatened. this time it's general john allen. he's in charge of u.s. forces in afghanistan, and he was about to be confirmed as the supr
. let's get started at capella.edu >>> the parents of a missing american journalist last seen in syria are in the middle east to try to find their son. deborah and mark tys travelled to beirut, lebanon, but they're still no closer to knowing what happened to their son austin. last time austin spoke to his family was august 13th, when he was about to leave syria for lebanon. >> we had no idea who was holding austin and that is the primary reason that we have come to lebanon is to try to find out where austin is, and establish contact with him and bring him safely home. >> everyone we have spoken to and we have spoken to everyone we can has said the same thing, that they are unsure where he is, they don't know who he's with, where he is, we're hoping for answers and we're here appealing to the people in the region to have compassion on our family. to whom ever has our son right now, we ask you to treat him well, keep him safe, and return him to us as soon as possible. >> the tics say the syrian government told them it has no idea where their 31-year-old son is, but the couple was encoura
now in syria, damascus international airport shut down. flights in and out are canceled. fierce fighting closed off the main road to the airport. these clashes happening as the country's internet goes dark and cell phone communication drops out. it's harder to post videos like this one. reportedly showing shelling in aleppo uploaded earlier today. in the past, the syrian government cut off access in an operation. but this is unprecedented. the military jet and two helicopters were shot down by rebels. now, takeovers at military bases given them a new arsenal of heavy weaponry. in this attack, they used rockets and as cnn's arwa damon reports, the rebels claiming this as a major victory. >> reporter: children on the back of a tractor made off with a sizable tangled lump of metal. what was all too often the cause of nightmares now a trophy of war. proudly shown off by this man. we want to take these pieces to show them to the other villages, he says. let them see what happened to these planes. everyone we speak to here describes the fear they felt any time they heard a jet overhea
. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that fighting intensifies much of syria's internet network has been cut. the government and opposition are blaming each other for the shutdown. whatever the truth, syria's regime is battling these men for its very survival. president assad's helicopters are being shot down. and even a mig jet was filmed tumbling from the sky. this rebel boasting that he's downed both a helicopter and a mig within 24 hours. these surface to air missiles
. an elderly woman is beaten and robbed and tonight her hero is speaking out. >>> the deadly attack in syria continue. now the president wants to know who is to blame for the bloodshed. >>> the voice of an r and >>> as the fighting in syria intensifies, civilians are rushing to flee their homeland. about 11,000 syrians have crossed into nearby countries in just the last 24 hours. syria's president remains defiant. >> reporter: it's been another deadly day in syria with several key developments helping around the country. they have seized an important crossing point along the syrian/turkish border. the border crossing could be one more access point for weapons and fighters into syria and an exit point for refugees trying to get out. in the past 24 hours the refugee agency says more than 11,000 people have fled into neighboring countries and 8,000 into turkey alone. that brings the total number of registered refugees since the conflict began 19 months ago to 4,000. the community of the red cross says it's no longer capable of meeting the humanitarian needs of the conflict. >> despite the fact
in new york as the region struggles to recover from the super storm sandy. >> syria and eu membership on the agenda and talks between angela merkel and the turkish prime minister. >> european and north african countries have kicked off negotiations on a huge solar energy project in the sahara desert. u.s. president barack obama has arrived in new jersey to tour the devastation left in the wake of super storm sandy. >> obama was joined by new jersey governor chris christie, who is republican, but christie has praised the way the president has handled the crisis. they viewed storm damage by helicopter. obama will also be meeting with residents and emergency workers. >> cleanup work is in full swing on the east coast after sandy flooded cities, washed out bridges, and caused billions of dollars in damage. >> but new york city is making it clear it is back in business. mayor michael bloomberg rate in the opening bell at the new york stock exchange, which was closed for two days. >> the storm killed over 40 people on the east coast and caused unprecedented damage. >> life is slowly returni
assad vows to live and die in syria, striking a violent note as the violence continues. and born into indian royalty, she risk her life behind enemy lines during world war ii. today she is finally honored for sacrifice. >> welcome to our viewers on public television and also around the globe and. tonight, the princess is installing the menu are going to leave china -- the process to install the men who are going to lead and china is under way. the outgoing china -- the outgoing president told them the correction is so-called -- so bad in china it could threaten leadership of the state. >> two days after america elected its president, china has begun the process of anointing its next leader. but no election here, instead, 2000 communist party delegates, including many from the army gathered for their progress. .hina's 1.3 billion people the communist party has reform in china, but not in a normal way. it is an anomaly. is an authoritarian regime running the world's second- biggest economy. modern leaders paying homage to pass commonness, mouse at all -- mao tse tung included. >> w
." >> this is "bbc world news america." i am katty kay. an assault as engines rise between syria and israel. it is a fortress like no other. how did one intruder slipped past security to get his hands on the keys to the tower of london? on publice to our viewers television and around the globe. the conflict in syria has widened with israel saying it will respond with severity if any more mortars landed in the heights. this has happened twice and wise israel has responded. today with direct hits on syrian units. the violence comes at the same time as the arab league has recognized the newly formed syrian opposition bloc as legitimate. on the ground, aircraft co. continued their bombardment. >> the war is brought perilously close to the turkish border. one of the bombs brought by syrian air force jets exploded barely 10 meters from the frontier, shattering windows and the turkish side. activists had several people were killed in the bombing. government forces try to recapture the town that fell to the rebels last week. the hostilities that more refugees streaming across the border. turkish am
in the middle east, in syria. margaret warner takes us inside the opposition forces and examines turkey's efforts to help the rebels. >> gist around this corner down this cobblestone street is a back alley where you can fiefned a whole underground economy. an underground economy that helps keep the syrian resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
is likely to change and where do you think syria is headed at this moment, although we have shifted our focus to this conflict between israel and hamas? dennis? >> what are the options that present themselves? >> look, i think syria is .. headed to a failed state which is nobody's interest in the region, and i think the key at this point is, for us to find a way to do more. you will already seeing the effort to build a more credible opposition. >> rose: right. >> now i think what is needed is also to ensure that the balance of power within that opposition is one that doesn't favor the radical islamists instead it means finding a way to get material support both nonlethal and lethal assistance to those who are more secular, who are submitted to an inclusive future for syria, who are committed to, in fact, a much more democratic future for syria. i think it is almost inevitable that we and others internationally are going to do more to build up the opposition because the alternative is to see a failed state where the kind of conflict you see within syria more and more begins not only to
about this? you look what they did and the syria war, in which was they had in 2006, you never heard word one about it before they did it. why are they vocal about this? there's three reasons why they have been so vocal. one, it was designed to motivate the rest of the world, and i think, by the way, if you, you know, we know from our emphasis regarding the idea that the europeans would have adopted the sanctions they did like a boycott on iranian oil if they didn't they the alternative was they would strike voluntarily, and to think that would have happened without the israeli, quote, motivation," is not realistic. the second reason they do it is because they are getting the world ready not to be surprised. if diplomacy fails, and the third reason is to get the public ready. that reflecting their reality, but in answer to the question, we've, you know, you've -- we've not had conversations with others that i'm aware of that would deal with that, but i note for you that david cameron made statements saying, you know, also repeated the words "all options on the table," we want deploam
was down today in syria and some traffic was halted at the airport in damascus as rebels battled government forces. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the "newshour" tonight, margaret warner examines what the latest clashes tell us about the strength of the assad regime and of the opposition. >> brown: then, we update the growing unrest in egypt where the islamist-dominated assembly fast-tracked a vote on a new constitution. >> suarez: we continue our conversations with newly-elected senators. tonight, arizona republican, jeff flake. >> >> we're at a point on the fiscal issues where we have to reach an agreement and perhaps as we do so that will start the stage for the other areas as well. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro has the story of a minnesota non- profit that celebrates diversity and the power of dance. >> they're one of the few companies that within their own work spans so many kinds of different style, from classical ballet to modern danceo contemporary performance to urban dance. >> suarez: and we look at college sports teams, moving from conference to
, on libya, syria, and other things. she doesn't pull any punches, but she was the first to speak in reply to this historic vote from the u.s. chair inside the general assembly and she said, look, pushing a green button inside the general assembly hall is not going to achieve middle east peace, this resolution really does not create a reality of a state. there is no state for the palestinians on the ground. it's counterproductive, there will be more obstacles. i'm sure shue knew that many people would be watching not just in the middle east but also on capitol hill where she will face potentially a nomination battle which is already under way. >> all right, richard roth, live for us at the u.n. in new york. thank you for that. >>> and, by the way, the israeli government spokesperson called the u.n. vote on the palestinian authority, quote, political theater. but the palestinian authority chief negotiator says the new status eliminates israeli justifications for building settlements in the disputed areas of east jerusalem and the west bank. ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevro
to universities. they focus on the violence and syria and the challenges each jet phases going forward. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i am bill clifford, president and ceo of world boston. as we head into the ultimate panel, assessing the aftermath of the arabs bring, please allow me to think todd culpeper, president and ceo of the world affairs council of america, his crack staff, national council chair, lori murray, and our many sponsors for this significantly stimulating conference thus far. [applause] like america, i am awash in debt it is time to make good on those obligations to each year on the panel, who i'm honored to present. i have had the pleasure of hearing at dozens of universities in the boston area. i am telling you a way overdue invitation to our counsel downtown. the professor is a senior fellow at the sovran center at brookings institution, a distinguished former adviser to my current adviser to many government agencies, u.s. leaders, and diplomats, and a prolific and best-selling author let me quote from the top of his website at the university of maryland
of aggression from iran we will speak with a former intelligence officer coming up next. and syria's president bashar al-assad's defiant message about his future. [ male announcer ] yep, there's 8 layers of ole grain fiber in those mini-wheats® biscuits... to help keep you full... ♪ 45 buels of wheat on the farm. 45 bushels of wheat! ♪ ...all mning long. there's a big breakft... [ mini ] yeehaw! ...in those fun little biscuits. [ male announcer ] the rhythm of life. [ whistle blowing ] where do you hear that beat? campbell's healthy request soup lets you hear it... in your heart. [ basketball bouncing ] heart healthy. great taste. mmm... [ male announcer ] sounds good. it's amazing what soup can do. >>shepard: now the new pentagon report that iran fired on an unarmed u.s. drone in international airspace. the c.e.o. of the washington, dc, consulting firm. what do you make of this? >>guest: two points. one, does this mean they can track our aircraft better? one went down over iran last year and they gathered intelligence. there have been newspaper stories about china and others collecting i
of syria. a video showing the aftermath of an air strike that purportedly hit a playground full of children. it comes as the assad regime launches a new wave of attacks across the country. we'll have an update from a photo journalist who spent eight days inside syria straight ahead on "360." for their clients' futures.ial d helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ but i'm still stubbed up. [ male announcer ] truth is, nyquil doesn't unstuff your nose. what? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus liquid gels speeds relief to your worst cold symptoms plus has a decongestant for your stuffy nose. thanks. that's the cold truth! thanks. with two times the points on dining in restaurants,? you may find yourself asking why not, a lot. chase sapphire preferred. there's more to enjoy. the distances aren't getting shorter. ♪ the trucks are going farther. the new 2013 ram 1500. ♪ with th
important than what happens in the united states, we do not cover it. we are engaged by what happens syria, but i do not know if shed a great deal of light. i know you began by asking what is happening in gaza and what i think about that. >> yes. >> any time israel is involved in a story, did becomes excruciatingly -- id becomes excruciatingly difficult to cover, because there is a sense of identity in this country with israelis, and many reporters, old friends and colleagues of mine used to be criticized for taking an anti- israeli point of view. he spent many years living in the arab world and had a sympathetic. of view to arabs. i think what is happening in gaza right now meets in the definition of tragedy. the israelis cannot be expected to stand by while their cities are rocketed. on the other hand, the idea that the israeli defense forces are equally professional, the number of casualties on the palestinian side are going to be much greater. they are leaving an impression there is something unfair. this is the time you need correspondents who have spent years in the region, because b
. >> and seeking clarity -- german chancellor angel merkel on how to develop renewable energy. we begin in syria where the military is currently stepping up its use of airpower in an effort to defeat the rebels. >> opposition forces say at least 70 people have been killed in an air strike near the turkish border. meanwhile, a video emerges of what appears to be opposition fighters executing government soldiers. >> the un says that if the video is authenticated, the action would constitute a war crime. >> as their prisoners cower in terror, rebels celebrate. this video is said to of been recorded in northwestern syria. government forces and rebels have been fighting there for weeks. on thursday, rebels stormed several army checkpoints. they appear to have captured these government soldiers. in the video, rebels yell, "you are assad's dogs" at their captives, and then they prayed. after that, they fired round after round, killing at least 10 of those prisoners. the united nations is trying to verify the video and says the killings probably constituted a war crime and those responsible should be pu
, a courageous fight made her a target. tens of thousands are urging peace for the young girl. one of syria's main opposition groups, the national council has elected a new leader. he vowed to work with others to accelerate the fall of what he calls a criminal regime. united nations says a 11,000 refugees have fled syria in 24 hours. >> aid agencies are warning it could be a catastrophe in syria. in the last few hours, the numbers fleeing have increased dramatically. >> in the last 24 hours alone, we have received 11,000 refugees have fled to neighboring countries. this is the highest number we have received so far, and it is one of the highest we have had for quite some time. >> 2.5 million people need aid, but many are receiving nothing. the relief operation is hampered by violence, a lack of funds and a lack of staff. the conflict is spreading. the u.s. expects the numbers to rise to 4 million by the start of next year. >> the solution is in the hands of politicians. they exclusively are of a political nature. >> agencies are stressing they can't be the answer for people to receive any g
elected leader of syria's main opposition group today criticized the international community for not doing enough to help overthrow the regime of bashar al-assad. he told russian tv there is no civil war. >> reporter: syria is being laid to waste. shattered by 20 months of grinding conflict that's turned cities into war zones, and once-peaceful neighborhoods into rubble. today, two suicide bombers killed at least 20 government soldiers according to opposition groups. the target was a military facility in dura, where the syrian uprising began last year amid hopes that the regime could be toppled. instead, the government is determined to stay in power. and tens of thousands of syrians have paid with their lives. this young boy survived an attack that tore through concrete walls. he was carried away, but not to safety. because he lives in a country at war with itself. yesterday, 11,000 syrians fled their country in one of the biggest exoduses since the fighting began. most crossed into turkey, driven by deadly clashes close to the border in the town ras al-ayn. more than 400,000 syrian refuge
: in syria opposition forces are uniting under a new leadership group. the u.s. and other western governments have been pressuring the opposition to form a common front while syria's ongoing civil war is drawing in its neighbors. >>> israel today fired a warning shot into syria after a stray mortar shell hit an israeli military post. no injuries were reported. >>> authorities allowed some residents to return to their homes in indianapolis after a natural gas explosion killed two people. firefighters found two bodies as they sifted through the rubble of homes leveled last night. four other people suffered minor injuries. the explosion damaged three dozen homes, some of them remain offlimits to residents. investigators spent the day looking for what caused the blast. >>> an update now on a story abc-7 news brought you earlier this week. a missing historic clock has been restored. veterans return the clock to its original sight in 1934 the clock was erected in honor of veterans killed in war. but it was cut off its metal base and stolen after a long court battle over its legality on public land.
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